Update: A missing quote on one of todays links merged Ron Conery and Jeremy Miller’s links - corrected now, and thanks to Alistair and Daniel for letting me know.

Software

  • SignalR/ReleaseNotes - The SignalR Team announce the release of SignalR 1.1, a release which includes significant improvements to the scale-out story, along with a healthy number of other bugfixes and improvements.
  • Introducing Backbone.js StarterKit - Kazi Manzur Rashid shares three NuGet packages which provide a basis for Knockout based Single Page Applications, with code written in JavaScript, CoffeeScript or TypeScript.

Information

  • Applying Conway’s Law - Phil Haack discusses Conway’s Law on software reflecting the organisational structure which created it, discussing his experiences at Microsoft and also how GitHub organise themselves.
  • Spot the defect: rounding - Eric Lippert shares a seemingly very simple piece of code, with a subtle but significant bug, and challenges his readers to find the bug - the answer is in the comments, and will be the focus of a later blog post too.
  • Troy Hunt: Clickjack attack - the hidden threat right in front of you - Troy Hunt discusses in detail the anatomy and security risks exposed by Clickjacking exploits, and looking at what you can do to protect your ASP.NET applications from such attacks.
  • SQL Server Performance Crib Sheet - Grant Fritchey has an updated version of his SQL Server Performance Crib Sheet, detailing a goodly number of things that are well worth knowing if you have to manage SQL Server at any level.
  • Knowing More Programming Languages Will Make You Smarter - Rob Conery discusses the benefits with learning new languages, both spoken and more specifically programming.
  • Would I use RavenDb again? - Jeremy D Miller shares his thoughts and experiences of using RavenDB as a backend database for an application, discussing some of the benefits and some of the limitations that his team ran into during implementation
  • New Contributor? Jump In! - Nik Molnar shares thoughts on Open source projects having a ‘Jump In’ list of easier issues ideal for someone looking to get involved with an Open Source project but unsure of what to start work with - a great idea, and certainly well worth maintaining from a project lead point of view - the OSS world can only be better off from more contributors.