ASP.NET

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Afternoon Tea – Sunday 10th June 2012

Posted by on 10 Jun 2012 | Tagged as: .NET, Afternoon Tea, ASP.NET, C#, COM Interop, Community, Database, Development, Links, Morning Brew, SysAdmin, Talks / Presentations

It’s been quite a while since the last ‘Afternoon Tea’ post, and there have been quite a lot of significant announcements in the past few weeks, coupled with my being busy at work which has resulted in me building up quite a backlog of links which I really wanted to include in a Morning Brew. This post is my attempt to ‘clear the decks’ and get caught up again, and also provides the perfect excuse to do a link roundup of DDD South West which I had the pleasure of presenting at at the end of last month.

Software

  • Introducing jQuery++ – Justin B Meyer and the folsk over at Bitovi announce the release of jQuery++, a collection of DOM helpers which complement and extend jQuery
  • Bundler.NET – Bundler.NET brings the CSS and JavaScript minification and combining features of .NET 4.5 to earlier versions of .NET. The installation is simple via a NuGet package and the API reflects the .NET 4.5 implementation.
  • bddify is moved to GitHub and is renamed to TestStack.BDDfy – Mehdi Khalili gives an update on TestStack.BDDfy, the project formerly known as bddify, discussing the name change, and change to the projects hosting, along with looking at the structure of the NuGet packages which amke up TestStack.BDDfy.
  • #mvvmlight V4 for Windows 8 RP is available – Laurent Bugnion announces the release of version 4 of his MVVMLight framework for Windows 8 Release Preview
  • Get latest CSS 3 support in Visual Studio 2010 – Mads Kristensen discusses how you can get the latest version of the CSS3 support into your Visual Studio 2010 installation providing a link to the schema files required and giving instructions on getting it setup and installed in Visual Studio 2010
  • Tree Surgeon – Alive and Kicking or Dead and Buried? – Bil Simser gives an update on an old tool that I used to make considerable use of in the past. Tree Surgeon was a tool to create a standardized format of Development Source Tree structure. In this post Bil discusses how the landscape of .NET development has changed in the 4 years since its last release with improvements in T4 Templating and NuGet, and questions if there is a future for the project.
  • Introducing RabbitBus – Derek Greer introduces RabbitBus, a .NET client API implementation for working with RabbitMQ, aiming to provide constructs which are not provided in the standard RabbitMQ .NET client. The library is open source with code available on GitHub, and the installation is available in NuGet package format.

Information

DeveloperDeveloperDeveloper South-West 4.0

The Morning Brew #990

Posted by on 28 Nov 2011 | Tagged as: .NET, ASP.NET, COM Interop, Development, Morning Brew, Photography

Disaster struck this morning – I pressed post, waited until the page reloaded and shut my laptop as usual, but for reasons unexplained the post never made it onto the site – So here is today’s edition, a little later than planned – at least its still morning *somewhere* in the world!

Thanks to Libor or letting me know something was wrong

Update: In my haste to resurect today’s post a ‘smart quote’ snook into some HTML merging Sankarsan & Jon Skeets links together – fixed now – thanks to EF for letting me know

Software

  • Simple.Data for Mono – Mark Rendle has got his Simple.Data Dynamic Data Access library up and running under Mono, with most of the tests passing. The Mono release is available as a tgz download from the project’s GitHub Site.

Information

  • New Bundling and Minification Support (ASP.NET 4.5 Series) – Scott Guthrie continues his series of posts looking at the new features of ASP.NET 4.5, currently available in the Developer Preview Release. In this post Scott discusses the new support for bundling and minification of CSS and JavaScript Resources.
  • Inside ASP.NET 4.5 Bundling and Minification – Sankarsan discusses some of the details behind the Bundling and minification, looking at how the functionality is implemented in the framework, discussing how the functionality is called and the interactions between the parts.
  • Eduasync part 17: unit testing – Jon Skeet continues his exploration of the Async / Await functionality of C#5 discussing how it is possible to unit test async code (sometimes), illustrating by showing and discussing some of the tests for his Majority Voting implementation.
  • Razor Donut Caching – Phil Haack discusses the possible look and feel for the re-introduction of donut caching in ASP.NET MVC4, highlighting a package available for MVC3 which adds the functionality and discussing some of the limitations and possible changes to Razor to make creating donut holes easy.
  • REPL for the Rosyln CTP 10/2011 – Chris Sells discusses the Roslyn CTP release and the Read Evaluate Print Loop (REPL) environment, looking into creating a console based REPL environment using Roslyn, showing how easy executing lines of code becomes with Roslyn.
  • Reflection, performance and runtime code generation – Ivan Towlson discusses the use of reflection and code generation with regard to the performance of code where you need to work with types you don’t know at compile time.
  • Building F# Solutions in Visual Studio 11 &
    Traffic Cop – Fresh Brewed Code, a new blogging community site for developers kicks off with posts from Dan Mohl highlighting resources for working with F# in Visual Studio 11, and Jim Cowart sharing an implementation he calls Traffic Cop for situations where he needed to avoid multiple jQuery Ajax requests for the same resources.
  • Method Stubs – Phil Trelford discusses Test Driven Development in F#, focusing particularly on how you don’t need frameworks to implement stubs and spies in F#.
  • 31 Days of Mango | Day #26: Background File Transfer , Day #27: Microphone API &amp Day #28: Media Library – Jeff Blankenburg’s series of posts on Windows Phone Mango continues with three more guest posts, first another from Gary Johnson discussing background file transfer. Next Parag Joshi discusses the Microphone API and the recording of audio, and finally Jeff Fansler takes a look at the Media Library.
  • 10 Laps around Silverlight 5 (Part 7 of 10) – Michael Crump continues his Silverlight 5 series with part 7 exploring operating system integration with a look at power awareness, 64 bit browser support and Save Dialogs.

Community

  • NxtGenUG – Santa Westley – Liam Westley joins the NxtGenUG in Coventry of their User Group meeting on Monday 12th December. There are no details of the session to be delivered, but Liam is an excelent speaker, and will nodoubt be brings some swat and probably some tasty treats too!

Relocating Temporary ASP.NET Files

Posted by on 15 Oct 2007 | Tagged as: .NET, ASP.NET, Development, IIS, SysAdmin

When you first request a page from the an ASP.NET application, the .NET framework takes the ASPX file and generates code to actually execute the page. This code is then compiled by the framework and the results of the compilation are stored in the Temporary ASP.NET files directory within the framework directory (usually located in c:\windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework). When the ASPX of the compiled DLL changes this code is re-generated and recompiled.
On a server that hosts lots of ASP.NET applications this store of temporary compiled code can occupy a considerable amount of space. On machines with a limited amount of space on their OS partition this can begin to cause problems. Thankfully the ASP.NET framework does allow the location of this directory to be specified as a custom location.
As with most server wide settings you need to make a change to the Machine.Config (for .NET 1.1) or Machine wide web.Config (for .NET 2). The crucial part of the configuration is the Compilation element within system.web. The compilation element has an optional attribute called tempDirectory that allows a new directory location to be specified overriding the default setting of %FrameworkInstallLocation%\Temporary ASP.NET Files.


   
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One thing to watch out for when making this change is the file permissions on your new Temporary ASP.NET files – copying the permissions from the original location will do the trick nicely.

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